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Impact on our society

How Alzheimer’s affects us all

People diagnosed with Alzheimer’s can live many years or even decades. Illnesses that last a long time usually have a big impact on patients, their families, caregivers, and the healthcare system. It can also affect the health care system.

The Global Burden Disease classification system measures things like the number of years a person has a disease. It also measures the amount of time someone needs help.

Alzheimer’s is the 6th most burdensome, or demanding, disease in the United States.

Family members usually become caregivers for people with Alzheimer’s. It is up to patients and families to manage Alzheimer's. In 2018, almost 18.5 billion hours of care were given to people with Alzheimer’s by people who were not doctors or nurses. Caregivers are usually women. They are not usually paid.

Typical caregiver tasks include helping with:

Moving around (sitting, standing, walking)

Moving around (sitting, standing, walking)

Getting dressed

Getting dressed

Bathing or showering

Bathing or showering

Eating

Eating

Bathroom tasks

Bathroom tasks

Talking to doctors

Talking to doctors

These types of daily tasks can affect caregivers in the long run. A lot of times, caregivers have high levels of stress and depression.

In 2019, healthcare costs for Alzheimer’s could reach about $290 billion in the US. That number is rising.

People diagnosed with Alzheimer’s can live several years or even decades with the disease. Diseases like Alzheimer’s that last a long time typically have a greater impact on both patients and the health care system.

The Global Burden Disease classification system measures things like the number of years with the disease and the amount of time spent disabled.

Alzheimer’s is the 6th most burdensome disease in the United States.

Caregiving often becomes the responsibility of patients as well as family members. It is estimated that in 2018 alone, there were more than 18.5 billion hours of informal care given to a patient with Alzheimer’s. Caregivers are typically women and are not usually paid.

Typical caregiver tasks include helping with:

Movement (sitting, standing, walking)

Movement (sitting, standing, walking)

Getting dressed

Getting dressed

Bathing or showering

Bathing or showering

Feeding

Feeding

Using the restroom and managing incontinence

Using the restroom and managing incontinence

Talking to healthcare team

Talking to healthcare team

These types of daily tasks can have a significant impact on caregivers in the long run. Caregivers frequently report high levels of stress and depression.

In 2019, healthcare costs for Alzheimer’s are expected to reach about $290 billion in the US—and that number is rising.

People with an Alzheimer’s diagnosis can survive for a number of years or even decades. Typically, illnesses with a prolonged duration tend to have greater consequences for both patients and the healthcare system.

The Global Burden Disease classification system analyzes factors such as the amount of years living with the disease and time spent disabled.

Alzheimer’s is the 6th most burdensome disease in the United States.

Caregiving generally becomes the responsibility of patients as well as family members. Based on estimations, more than 18.5 billion hours of informal care were given to patients with Alzheimer’s disease in 2018 alone. Unpaid females typically take on the role of caregiver.

Standard duties for caregivers of patients with Alzheimer’s disease include assistance with:

Mobility (sitting, standing, and walking)

Mobility (sitting, standing, and walking)

Dressing

Dressing

Grooming, including bathing or showering

Grooming, including bathing or showering

Feeding

Feeding

Managing incontinence

Managing incontinence

Communicating with healthcare team

Communicating with healthcare team

Assistance with these sorts of daily activities can have a drastic impact on caregivers over prolonged periods of time, and caregivers frequently cite high levels of psychological distress, including stress and depression.

According to estimates, healthcare-related spending for Alzheimer’s is projected to reach approximately $290 billion in the US in 2019—and that amount is escalating.
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References: 1. 2019 Facts & Figures. 2. Alzheimer's disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/aging/aginginfo/alzheimers.htm#Who. Accessed October 8, 2019. 3. Daily care. Alzheimer's Association. https://www.alz.org/help-support/caregiving/daily-care. Accessed October 29, 2019.